• Turns paper pages in books.
  • Imitates movements such as “flying” like a bird or “jumping” like a frog.
  • Scribbles on paper, making circular scribbles and lines.
  • Crosses the center of the body with one hand when scribbling – until a child can do this, he will switch hands to scribble on the left or right side of the writing surface.

 

  • Talks using phrases and short sentences of three or more words.
  • Understands many words, phrases and simple questions, such as, “Where is Mommy?”
  • Recites phrases or stories from his favorite book.
  • Will “fill in the blank” when you leave off the last word or phrase of a familiar story or rhyme.
  • Corrects you if you read the story wrong – won’t let you skip any words or pages, or say the wrong word (you can make this into a game when reading with your child).
  • Chooses to play and pretend with books by reading books on his own.
  • Likes to listen to stories with rhymes and word patterns that are repeated.

 

  • Keep building daily routines around books. Make the library a regular part of your routine.
  • Bring audio books on outings away from home or download children’s books on your phone or tablet to listen to when waiting in lines or at doctors’ offices.
  • Be willing to read the same book over and over to build your child’s confidence in reading.
  • Ask your child questions about a story, such as what will happen next, how a character might feel or how the story relates to your child’s life.
  • Talk with your child using new vocabulary, longer sentences and simple questions during conversation – “How old are you?” “Do you have a doggie?” “Go get Daddy’s shoes in the kitchen.”
  • Tape large pieces of unlined paper to a flat surface for drawing.
  • Use the sidewalk or driveway for scribbling with chalk or paint with a paintbrush and bucket of water.
  • Does not speak in sentences – continues to use single words instead of phrases (“milk” instead of “want milk” or “I want milk”).
  • Does not have conversations – does not answer simple questions or make eye contact to keep a brief conversation going.
  • Seems to be “in his own world” – does not interact socially much at all, stays to himself when others are around, does not point and talk to get another person’s shared attention.
  • Does not hold toys well with either hand – has trouble using fingers to grasp small objects, preferring to use the palm of the hand instead.
  • Has problems walking and running smoothly – looks very awkward or clumsy, gets feet tangled up more than other kids of the same age.

More Fun Ideas